nursing homes

Facilities are beginning to innovate and put in place best practices to drive down the number of COVID-19 cases among residents and staff.
The pandemic has changed the way we think of long-term care, and if we lean into the crisis-earned set of lessons learned, we can do more than just tweak the system. We can transform it.
Now that we are reaching a point where the U.S. has an adequate supply of COVID-19 vaccines, officials must consider how to identify and reach older adults who remain unvaccinated, particularly those who want but have been unable to access a vaccine.
mother and daughter
Presumptive eligibility expands consumer choice and can empower consumers to access public funded home and community-based services without lengthy determination delays.
While the deployment of vaccines in nursing homes has largely been a success thus far, facilities are far from finishing this task. They must now enter a next phase of vaccination and confront a new set of issues.
In the four weeks from October 19 to November 15, the number of deaths increased by two-thirds, and the number of new cases doubled compared to the previous four weeks.
To support states both in dealing with the crisis in nursing homes and shaping the future of LTSS, the AARP Public Policy Institute (PPI) has created and released three tools this fall: the Nursing Home COVID-19 Dashboard, the LTSS State Scorecard, and the LTSS Choices series.
The pandemic underscores the need for policy makers to foster the development of housing alternatives for older adults outside of institutional settings.
These actions can enable relationships between family caregivers and long-term facility residents during the spread of COVID-19.
Senior couple in wheelchair in autumn nature.
The future is unclear for a major federal demonstration program that was created to expand the range of long-term services and supports (LTSS) options available to individuals
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