nutrition

An older man wearing a protective face mask chooses a shopping cart at the supermarket
SNAP, formerly "food stamps," needs additional investments and flexibility to respond to the pandemic.
Recently passed legislation will allow food programs to ramp up home meal delivery.
Urban elderly
One in four older black and Hispanic Medicare beneficiaries is food insecure.
Depressed Senior Adult Man With Stacks of Papers and Envelopes
A proposed rule would disproportionately impact SNAP households with seniors.
Recent federal proposals would add additional barriers to an already underused program, including efforts to require older adults to prove they’re engaging in work activities for a certain number of hours per week or risk losing SNAP after three months
Imagine living alone, being frail or living with a disability, and unable to leave your house without help. Now imagine feeling a hunger pang, opening up your fridge to find it empty, or wondering how you are going to get your next meal.
As the U.S. population ages and SNAP faces the prospect of changes that could affect the future of the program, it becomes all the more important to examine the dynamics around this large segment of SNAP users. AARP Public Policy Institute’s recently released fact sheet takes a closer look at SNAP households with older adults.
“Without SNAP, I don’t know how I’d be able to afford to eat.”
In February, we are surrounded by hearts. They’re everywhere—in the grocery store, shopping malls and email inboxes. You may also hear more about heart health, because February is  American Heart Month. Taking steps to strengthen your heart yields a bonus—you’ll be protecting your brain as well.
As the executive director of the Global Council on Brain Health (GCBH), I am always on the lookout for brain-healthy foods. I scan grocery aisles for chocolate bars with more than 70 percent cocoa, feel that I’m stimulating my brain when I down my morning coffee and even feel virtuous when drinking a glass or two of red wine. Turns out all my assumptions have been wrong.
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