obesity

diabetes
Did you know? Diabetes rates are significantly higher among Americans age 65 and older than in any other age group. Nearly a quarter (23 percent) of Americans 65 and older reported having diagnosed diabetes in 2015, according to a recent AARP Public Policy Institute analysis. Diabetes, a chronic condition in which the body is unable to produce or use insulin efficiently, leads to higher-than-normal blood sugar levels and is associated with higher risk for obesity and cardiovascular disease. Long-term complications from diabetes include damage to nerves, eyes and kidneys. Widely recognized as a major public health concern, diabetes costs the U.S. health system around $176 billion annually.
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A new report shows Americans are getting better at smoking less, exercising more and reducing deaths from heart disease, but the past year has also brought an alarming rise in the rate of drug deaths, obesity and diabetes.
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Thanksgiving is all about getting together over food — and I’m fine with that. But then comes that killer five-week stretch of yet more parties and food, with plenty of festive (and fattening) drinks thrown in.
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America’s boomers just got a 10-year health checkup, and the diagnosis is mixed: More are dealing with chronic conditions, especially high blood pressure and high cholesterol, but fewer are dying from cancer and heart disease, thanks to recent medical advances.
AA Age 50+-Did you know
In January 2011, AARP interviewed Americans 50 and older from every state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. We asked about their dreams as they think about what is next in their life as well as the challenges they see themselves facing.
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Michael Clarke Duncan was full of life just three years ago. The then-54-year-old actor was at the pinnacle of his career. His Academy Award-nominated performance as John Coffey in The Green Mile is still revered.
calories
It’s no secret that older Americans’ waistlines are expanding. From 2004 to 2013, the proportion of adults ages 50 and older who were obese increased 21 percent, from 25 to 31 percent of the population*. Associated with chronic diseases like heart disease and diabetes, rising levels of obesity are taking a toll on individual health and quality of life, as well as health care costs. Among all age groups, obesity accounts for approximately 21 percent of all health spending.
Insulin shot
Having diabetes or prediabetes in midlife is linked to memory problems later in life, according to new research published in Annals of Internal Medicine. In fact,  diabetes appears to age the brain about five years faster than normal aging.
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Ladies, are we going from zaftig to zeppelin? According to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the waist size of the average American woman grew almost two inches — from just over 36 to nearly 38 — from 1999 to 2012.
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Not exercising isn't completely your fault.
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