online privacy

Five Takeaways from New AARP Research on Tech Usage
New AARP research shows that people of all ages are using technology to keep in touch with friends and family. The way people use their devices differ somewhat based on whether they are in their 50s, 60s, 70s, etc. The full survey can be accessed here.
Information privacy button on computer keyboard
In today’s digitally connected world, I worry about the lack of control I have over the privacy of my personal information. And I’m not alone. A Pew survey found 91 percent of adults strongly agree that consumers have lost control of how companies collect and use their personal information.
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Internet-connected devices are rapidly becoming commonplace in our daily lives. Smartphones, tablets, televisions, thermostats, cars, video games and even children’s toys now connect to the Internet.
shoes
The brightly colored running shoes stare back at me from my computer screen. They’ve been following me from website to website — ever since I clicked on them while browsing an online store the week before.
Social media icons
Some parents have battled over technology use with their children since grammar school. First came the debate on what age to allow their own cellphones. Then we moved on to laptops in the bedroom, limiting computer time, blocking certain websites. Then texting during meals and conversations. Now we move on to social media, the alternate universe where young adults typically spend more than three hours daily on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, among other apps.
We know that everyone is using social networks these days - and that boomers are social networking more and more. A recent AARP study on the matter showed that more than a quarter of Americans age 50+ are on social networking sites.
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