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Complaint Free World
My dad was a master complainer. A king of kvetching. He had a symphony of noises and a palette of winces and scowls to make his annoyance known to all. Dad would never have taken part in a growing fad: purple rubber bracelets carved with the words "A Complaint Free World." Ten million bracelets are supposedly out there in more than 100 countries, although who knows how many are being worn.
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Bad news for the relentlessly cheery Pollyannas among us: Grumpy old men (and women) may live longer. Or so says a new German study that suggests that pessimists live longer, healthier lives than those who are overly optimistic.
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Optimism among the aged may be more common than you think. By "you," I mean the proverbial you, of course -- you in particular might have no doubt that life doesn't stop being a bowl of cherries at 65. Based on what frequently runs in the media, however, anyone could be forgiven for thinking older Americans are all just downright miserable. So what a surprising change of pace this "United States of Aging"� survey turned out to be.
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Life is good? Most retirees think so, at least according to one new survey. Conducted by USA Today, UnitedHealthcare and the National Council on Aging, the poll of Americans age 60 and older found a surprising amount of optimism in a cohort often painted as scared, sad and struggling.
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A new survey of Americans' attitudes about aging yielded some fascinating -- and surprising -- nuggets, including the fact that more than half of us think we look younger than our age, 70 percent of those over 65 say they're more active than their parents were, and most of us say age 38 was when we first "felt our age."
Remember about a week ago when I shared an article about optimism being linked to health? Well, here's a Reuters piece on a study that shows that baby boomers are not very optimistic about their chances of retiring.
Today an article in the Washington Post's Health column takes a look at a recent study published in the journal "Circulation" that shows that people with a more positive outlook on life tend to be healthier than their "pessimistic counterparts." Specifically, the study found that optimists are 9 percent less likely to develop heart disease and 14 percent less likely to die from any cause.
A recent study shows that older people tend to have more realistic expectations for the future.
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