passwords

Man stealing woman's personal information
Identity theft is hard, but preventing it doesn’t have to be. Although some threats like data breaches are beyond your control, here are eight easy, no-cost ways to help scam-proof yourself in the New Year.
Platinum Credit Card macro, with data holding microhip and padlock motif
Despite stability in the number of victims and losses last year, the ways that credit card fraud occurs have changed. With the switch to chip-enabled EMV cards in 2015, identity thieves are moving from cloning counterfeits of that existing plastic and, instead, are focusing on opening new fraudulent accounts with stolen Social Security numbers and other sensitive data.
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If you recently changed your password to “starwars” in honor of the blockbuster movie, congratulations. Your new password is among the world’s worst — or rather, one of the most hackable.
Stressed out man with laptop
Happy New Year! Start 2016 on the right foot, with these simple steps to reduce your risk of scams:
Older couple worrying about their money situation
October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month, and no doubt you’re fully aware of what happened to Target, Home Depot and scores of other companies that were victims of cyber attacks. Those big-brand data breaches certainly make news.
Students in front of lockers
With the kids returning to school, you’ve earned a sigh of relief. But don’t breathe too easy just yet.
Four Ways to Watch Your Wi-Fi
Although some 84 percent of American adults who use the Internet access it on a daily basis, new AARP research finds that many continue to engage in risky online behaviors — especially at free Wi-Fi hot spots that are potential hotbeds for computer hacking.
Tech support scammer
En español | For six years, telephones have been ringing off the hook with alarming but bogus news: There’s a dangerous virus on your computer, and the caller – a self-described technician with Microsoft, “Windows” or an antivirus software company – says he can remove it … for a price.
Paying at Starbucks with smartphone
Starbucks devotees, prepare for a jolt beyond what’s provided in those morning cappuccinos: Hackers are draining financial accounts of customers who use a Starbucks gift card or mobile app to pay for coffee.
Woman using laptop
En español | Got word that your friends are getting word from you about being mugged abroad or pitching discount Viagra and other spam? Or maybe you can’t log in to even check your email.
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