Phone Scams

We’ve all experienced our phones ringing off the hook with a barrage of telemarketing calls. While these calls can be a real nuisance, some are far worse. Scammers use the latest telemarketing technology to rip off victims to the tune of millions of dollars each year. The threat of financial loss is especially great for older Americans living off of their retirement nest eggs.
Businessman covering the phone
“Call from 877-382-4357? Hang up,” warns the Federal Trade Commission. Seems that phone number — better known as 877-FTC-HELP, the agency’s go-to hotline to report scams — is another example in the never-ending plague of spoofing, the practice of deliberately displaying a false number (and sometimes name) on the recipient’s caller ID.
Smart nervous hackers working together
Gray-haired folk have long held “most scammed” status, but it may be time to pass on that unfortunate legacy. While the retirement-aged are targeted most often, data increasingly shows that it’s millennials — our children and grandchildren ages 18 to 35 — who are most likely to lose money to fraudsters. Consider these recent findings:
older woman using smart phone
The telephone is a scammer’s best weapon, used in 77 percent of money-netting schemes, according to the government’s latest scam-tracking data. The best ammo: fear, and here’s how it bangs best for the biggest bucks:
Search AARP Blogs