physical activity

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In April 2015, the Institute of Medicine released a groundbreaking report on what older Americans can do to keep their brains healthy. The report said that obesity was likely to increase the risk of cognitive decline. The same month, a major study in the British medical journal Lancet found that being underweight in middle age and old age is linked to an increased risk for dementia. Confused? You’re not alone. This is just one example of scientific reports that generate conflicting news headlines. Do brain games work to strengthen memory? Does lifting weights and practicing yoga make a difference? Can certain foods decrease risk of dementia?
Two senior black women pwer walking
There's no debate that exercise can help us live a longer, healthier life. But let's say you have a chronic health condition that makes exercise difficult. Or maybe you're just very busy. Is there a minimum amount of exercise older adults can do to reap at least some benefits?
Senior man sleeping on sofa
How bad are Americans about not getting any physical activity whatsoever? Really bad. Like record-setting bad.
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If a new British study is right, slow and steady wins the (health) race for older men trying to lower their risk of stroke.
gardening
Not a big fan of exercising at the gym or in a class? No problem! You can get similar health benefits from gardening, mowing the lawn or housework, says a new study of nearly 4,000 60-year-olds.
Coffee to prevent uterine cancer
It doesn't get as much attention as breast cancer, but uterine cancer - also referred to as endometrial cancer - primarily strikes women over 60, killing more than 8,000 a year.
I don't eat seafood - but this article from the Wall Street Journal today is seriously making a good case for consuming more fish with omega-3 fatty acids.
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