privacy

Five Takeaways from New AARP Research on Tech Usage
New AARP research shows that people of all ages are using technology to keep in touch with friends and family. The way people use their devices differ somewhat based on whether they are in their 50s, 60s, 70s, etc. The full survey can be accessed here.
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After years of waiting, the “smart home” is finally becoming a reality for many consumers. The idea behind the smart home is to help automate routine tasks and make homes more efficient.
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It’s been almost impossible to avoid the constant stream of media reports discussing the pending release
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We’ve been hearing a lot lately about the “Internet of Things” (IoT). Often, the discussion revolves around issues associated with data privacy and cybersecurity.
Medical Technology
Hundreds of health applications these days can track our weight, steps, caloric intake, blood pressure - and even our friends' workouts at the gym. And those diagnosed with an ailment can go online to get answers to health questions or share their stories with others suffering from the same illness.
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Imagine that your mother is in a long-term care facility. On your weekend visits, she's told you that the nurses and aides there are taking things from her, pinching her and refusing to change her diapers when she soils them.
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By Elizabeth Stawicki, Minnesota Public Radio, Kaiser Health News
Facebook announced its new graph search and that means if you've ignored your privacy settings, now is a really good time to check it out
Facebook announced this week it will make it a lot easier to search your personal page along with all of your friends. It's called the Facebook Graph Search. While this announcement does not change your privacy settings on Facebook, it means if you've ignored your privacy settings, now is a really…
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Anyone who's watched more than a few episodes of Law & Order knows how easy it is to unwittingly get a sample of someone's DNA -- a discarded coffee cup, a used Kleenex, a few stray hairs and you're good to go. In Dick Wolf's world, such samples are used to catch the bad guys (or exonerate the good guys), but in real life, genetic code can reveal a variety of information, including what diseases may lurk in someone's future. This type of genetic testing -- known as whole genome sequencing -- has many useful applications. But a report released today by the presidential bioethics commission reveals that many legal issues surrounding genetic privacy have yet to be addressed.
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This is a guest post by Sid Kirchheimer.
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