recession

Dec 2018 blog table
The economy added 312,000 jobs in December, a strong increase from the 176,000 jobs added in November (revised up from 155,000), according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ December Employment Situation Summary
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More and more investors are telling me that their portfolios have now fully recovered from the 2008 stock market crash. I respond in my typical tactless way by telling them their performance has been awful. That’s because stocks are now 64 percent above their pre-crash high.
Older workers
Workers 50 and older face a hurdle that younger peers don’t: how to overcome negative stereotypes that paint them as much more expensive, out of touch with technology and less productive.
Older Job seeker standing out in crowd
Older job seekers who were out of work at some point in the last five years found that tapping their network of contacts, reaching out to employers directly and starting their job search immediately rather than taking a break tended to be more successful in landing a job, according to a new report entitled “The Long Road Back: Struggling to Find Work After Unemployment,” by the AARP Public Policy Institute.
Reaching for the top
Part of the promise of the American Dream is that each generation will do better than the last. Has that happened with our adult children, the millennials? Well, “yes and no,” reports the U.S. Census Bureau. Our children are better educated as a generation, yet more are living in poverty and they have lower rates of employment.
Jean Chatzky
Jean Chatzky has a few choice words for how most folks describe their relationship with money: Confusing. Frightening. Chaotic. Stressful. Precarious.
Senior couple did not have money to repay the loan
Five years after the Great Recession, many Americans say they're still struggling to get by financially. Nineteen percent of adults ages 55 to 64 say they have no retirement savings or pensions to fall back on, according to a survey by the Federal Reserve.
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First the good news: Millions of jobs that were lost during the Great Recession seem to be finally coming back.
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The home foreclosure crisis that swept through the nation during the Great Recession may not be over for thousands of troubled borrowers.
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Only 15 percent of Americans age 45 or older looked for a job in the past year because of employment uncertainty, according to our AARP Bulletin poll published in September. It has been six years since the start of the Great Recession, but people are still uneasy about their current jobs. Confidence about job stability has improved since 2009, but fewer than half of those polled feel that their jobs are stable (49 percent now versus 39 percent in 2009). The poll included 1,019 people 45 and older.
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