retirement planning

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We all rely on advice — from friends, family and, at times, complete strangers. Sometimes you get good advice and other times you get advice that is not in your best interest. But if you get advice from a professional like a doctor, a lawyer or a financial professional, you should be able to rely on knowing that it will always be in your best interest.
Social Security Card and Coins
When should you begin taking Social Security benefits? That was a question asked of AARP.org visitors and registered website users . Less than 19 percent selected age 70, though that’s exactly what I tell the vast majority of my clients to do. Most object to my recommendation until I frame the decision in a different way, which is that they can spend money now and still let it grow.
Social Security and Taxes
Most adults likely have heard of Social Security — or seen the taxes for it taken out of their paychecks. But when quizzed on some of the basics of the program, only 28 percent got a passing grade.
Doctor with patient
You’ve heard this before, I know, and yet it remains as disturbing as ever. Health care costs, along with housing, are likely to be your biggest expenses in retirement. Boston-based  Fidelity Investments found that premiums, deductibles and other out-of-pocket expenses could cost a 65-year-old couple retiring today a jaw-dropping $220,000 – and that’s in addition to Medicare premiums.
older couple on a bench
Staying healthy and how to pay for it are the top concerns for boomers and retirees, a study has found.
Senior couple did not have money to repay the loan
Five years after the Great Recession, many Americans say they're still struggling to get by financially. Nineteen percent of adults ages 55 to 64 say they have no retirement savings or pensions to fall back on, according to a survey by the Federal Reserve.
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Own Your Tomorrow.
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The road to retirement may seem uncomfortably short, particularly if you're in your 50s and haven't saved much.
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If you've been putting the maximum amount of money into a tax-deferred retirement plan and were hoping to set aside even more next year, you'll be disappointed by the IRS's decision not to increase the limits.
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Old, schmold. Our brains may be getting a little slower as we age, but we more than make up for it in experience when making economic decisions, a new study finds.
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