rhythm and blues

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In the 1950s, Joe Bihari scoured African American bars and nightclubs in the South for undiscovered blues phenoms. Bihari, who passed away on Nov. 28 at age 88, tried to elevate those he found to stardom at Modern Records, the Los Angeles-based label that he cofounded with his brothers, Jules and Saul.
If you grew up in the 1960s, when you think of R&B, you probably think of classic Motown - the earnest, energetic sound of Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye, and the Temptations, among others - or else the harder, funkier Stax/Volt Records sound from Memphis, exemplified by the Staple Singers and Isaac Hayes. But if you were a teenager a decade later in the mid-1970s, you probably got down at high school dances to what people called the Philadelphia Sound or Philly Soul - a musical genre that paired lush strings with the hard-edged honk of a horn section, topped with buttery vocals.
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