AARP and FEMA form a Partnership in Disaster Relief
It's hurricane season.
There was enough warning, you could watch the weather channel and the local news to watch the path of Hurricane Sandy. Everyone knew she was coming. Experts were predicting the worst-case scenarios. But in the aftermath, the truth of what Hurricane Sandy left behind in the burned-out homes in Breezy Point, Queens, to the flooded buildings and subways in New York City. The reality of the devastation was widespread and heartbreaking. In the words of President Obama  "This is going to take some time," he said. "It is not going to be easy for these communities to recover." We have seen the resiliency of New York City and it's citizens' uncanny ability to pull together in times of great tragedy. From the terrorist attacks of 9/11, to Hurricane Sandy, New Yorkers have a spirit that is not so easily broken.
Here in Washington, D.C. most people have stocked their cabinets with water, batteries and non-perishable foods and settled into their cozy homes to weather the severe rain and wind that Hurricane Sandy is unleashing. But what about those who don't have a roof over their head?
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