Senate

As the Senate defeated the “skinny” health care repeal bill this morning, AARP thanked Republican Senators Susan Collins, John McCain, and Lisa Murkowski, as well as Senate Democrats and Independents for opposing the bill.
As the Senate plans to vote on the so-called “skinny” health care repeal bill, AARP continues its strong opposition to all of the health care repeal bills, which would ultimately result in higher costs and less coverage for older Americans.
In response to Tuesday’s Senate vote on the motion to proceed to consider a health care bill that would cut Medicare and Medicaid and impose an Age Tax on older Americans, AARP  Executive Vice President Nancy LeaMond released the following statement:
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The just-released Senate bill, the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA), is very bad news for older adults. The bill would reduce financial assistance (premium tax credits and cost-sharing subsidies) and change rules on how much premiums can vary by age (age rating). As a result, people ages 50 to 64 would have to pay thousands of dollars more in premiums to buy health insurance in the individual (nongroup) market.
RAISE Act
This week, the U.S. Senate began its consideration of the RAISE (Recognize, Assist, Include, Support and Engage) Family Caregivers Act — an important piece of legislation that would start a national conversation about ways to aid Americans’ greatest support system — family caregivers. Thanks to the leadership and support of Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine), Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.), Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) and Michael Bennet (D-Colo.) and Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and ranking member Patty Murray (D-Wash.), the bill was quickly approved by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pension Committee (which goes by the very appropriate acronym . . . HELP).
mature woman embracing senior woman
BREAKING UPDATE 12/9/15: The RAISE Family Caregivers Act passed the U.S. Senate on December 8 by unanimous consent.
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We must make our streets safer! Today in our country a pedestrian suffers an injury every eight minutes and one is killed every two hours! That’s been an upward trend in recent years. In the decade from 2003 to 2012, more than 47,000 people nationwide died while walking on our streets, 16 times the number who died in natural disasters during the same period. More than 676,000 pedestrians were injured over the same decade. These tragedies happen to individuals of all ages. But an older pedestrian is particularly vulnerable. Among pedestrian fatalities, nearly 1 of every 5 is 65 or older.
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The U.S. Senate unanimously approved legislation Monday night requiring hospitals across the nation to tell Medicare patients when they receive observation care but have not been admitted to the hospital. It’s a distinction that’s easy to miss until patients are hit with big medical bills after a short stay.
Brook Astor At The Premiere of Nicholas Nickleby
The Senate Special Committee on Aging held one of its periodic hearings on financial abuse of older people the other day, this time inviting a relative involved in one of the more spectacular headline-making cases in recent years to testify.
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Older voters continue to lean Republican in this year's Senate races, a new survey shows, but there have been significant shifts in seven battleground states from a comparable survey by the same organizations nearly two months ago. Overall, Republicans are on the cusp of gaining the six seats they need to take control of the Senate in the Nov. 4 election, shows the survey, conducted by YouGov of Palo Alto, Calif., for the New York Times/CBS News Battleground Tracker.
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