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TV commercials for 7Up made a powerful impression on us in the 1970s and '80s in large part because of the pitchman: A handsome gentleman clad in an elegant white suit and hat, who spoke in stentorian tones infused with a Caribbean lilt. Lounging in a straw chair, Geoffrey Holder touted the no-caffeine virtues of the "Uncola" as he poured and sipped a glass of the bubbly beverage, and at the end, drove home his point by leaning back his head and laughing with an earthy, authentic robustness. He made the soft drink seem not just cooly refreshing, but cool.
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Television host Katie Couric, whose new documentary, "Fed Up," blames sugar for the country's spiraling obesity problem, is challenging people to take a 10-day break from the sweet stuff.
Diet Sodas
Healthy, postmenopausal women who drink two or more diet sodas a day are at a higher risk for heart attack, stroke and even death, according to a large new national study.
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After two decades, the nutrition labels on the food products we buy are getting a much-needed update, with proposed changes that provide a more realistic picture of the serving size, calories and added sugar those products contain.
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Otra vez las sodas o refrescos vuelven a las noticias y de manera negativa. En esta ocasión la Administración de Alimentos y Medicamentos (FDA, por sus siglas en inglés) está investigando el colorante que se usa en algunas sodas, maltas -y hasta alimentos- para darles ese tono caramelo, tan apetitoso a la vista.
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Caramel coloring, the stuff used to give sodas their brown color, may sound harmless, but a new study shows it can contain a chemical that's been linked to cancer - and the Food and Drug Administration is checking it out.
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Regular soda is full of sugar and calories that can make you fat, but what about no-calorie, diet soda? Shouldn't it help keep you from gaining weight?
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It's addictive and can lead to serious chronic disease, so why shouldn't sugar be regulated by the government just like those other addictive, unhealthy substances, tobacco and alcohol?
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