Stevie Wonder

Paul McCartney at 2014 Grammys
The 2014 Grammy Awards had a distinctly throwback feel, as some of the classic performers from the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s joined current hit-makers onstage. Here are some of the highlights:
A group of American and South African students, aged from 11 to 19, met with Nelson Mandela at the Nelson Mandela Foundation in Johannesburg, on 2 June 2009. This is part of a series of activities ahead of Mandela Day on 18 July.
Nelson Mandela, who died Dec. 5 at age 95 in Johannesburg, South Africa, was one of the most remarkable heroes of the 20th century. He organized and led armed resistance against South Africa's apartheid regime, which had disenfranchised 23 million black citizens and forced them to live in abysmal poverty, and endured decades of brutal imprisonment as a result. But after his release in 1990, he worked to negotiate a peaceful end to institutionalized racism - an achievement that earned him a share of the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize - and eventually became his nation's first black president from 1994 to 1999.
When you think of the Motown era, you probably think of such groups as the Supremes, the Temptations, the Four Tops and Martha Reeves and the Vandellas, and such soul superstars as Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder. Less well-known is a man who helped Motown's performers to shine so brightly: Frank Wilson, a musical utility infielder who cowrote and/or produced many of the label's biggest hits.
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If you grew up in the late 1960s, odds are that you remember watching The Andy Williams Show with your parents and marveling at how unexpectedly funky that venerable gentleman with the silky baritone sounded when he sang Stevie Wonder's "For Once In My Life."
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