survey

Worried
How we cope with stress is an important factor in our mental well-being which, in turn, impacts our brain health as we age. How we personally view getting older is also related. Adults who look at aging positively report higher mental well-being scores, says a new survey.
I spent time a few weeks ago with hundreds of our nation’s mayors at the U.S. Conference of Mayors’ 85th Annual Winter Meeting. In addition to listening to leaders like New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) and Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx (during his final hours in that position) talk about the state of our cities, I shared the results of a survey AARP and the U.S. Conference of Mayors conducted last year.
We’re in the homestretch of the 2016 election and women voters are certainly getting a lot of attention. Older women — particularly women of the boomer generation — may decide the presidential election. Unfortunately, the candidates and the news media aren’t addressing their everyday needs and concerns.
August 17 2016 Women's Poll
On Aug. 14, Social Security turned 81 years old — an important milestone that had me reflecting on how far we’ve come . . . and how much work we still need to do.
Open white doors with rays of light on blue wall
Every new year brings new resolutions — exercise more, eat a healthier balanced diet and maybe even travel to new countries are a few of the common goals individuals set out for themselves when starting a fresh year. For 2016, there is another popular goal on many Americans’ to-do lists — find a new job.
Group of Human Arms Raised with Concrete wall
Come Election Day 2016, the country will elect a new president after an endless round of campaigning and debates. How will our adult children influence the selection of the new POTUS?
Older couple preparing healthy meal with fresh vegetables
En español | An  AARP survey on brain health has found a significant gap between what people believe is good for their brains and what they actually do to preserve their cognitive function. The survey, of more than 1,500 adults over age 40, found that although 98 percent said maintaining and improving brain health was very or somewhat important, only about half are participating in activities — such as exercising, eating a healthy diet and reducing stress — that have been shown to protect cognitive health. Nearly 4 in 10 surveyed also said they have noticed a decline in their ability to remember things over the past five years.
Millennials overreacting
Just 26 percent of people under 30 are investing in stocks, according to a survey published by Bankrate.com, a personal finance site. By comparison, 58 percent of adults ages 50 to 64 invest in stocks. Since millennials have a much longer time horizon, stocks are generally more appropriate for them. So this trend is exactly the opposite of what logic would dictate.
Selfie - mother, child and kitten
earlier this month sparked the observation that some of our adult children take a different approach to parenthood. This is not their childhood redux. The changes range from care and feeding to playtime and parenting philosophy. According to a study of more than 10 million millennial parents, 50 percent agree with the statement “I am raising my kids the way I was raised,” while another 50 percent disagree or are neutral to the statement.
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En español |  Don’t expect boomers to jump into retirement and pursue a life of full-time leisure. Once they leave the workforce, many of them want to, well, continue working — often in an entirely new field.
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