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Many people know George Takei as Mr. Sulu from TV's popular Star Trek and most recently as a social media guru and host of the AARP-produced YouTube series "Takei's Take." But the Los Angeles native also has ties to Japan, where he lost an aunt and a cousin after the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, wiping out the port city on Aug. 6, 1945. Eight years old at the time, Takei was incarcerated with his parents and siblings in a Japanese American internment camp in California. Takei recently returned to Hiroshima for his AARP YouTube series to explore the effects of the A-bomb and technology's role in the event.
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Smartphones can do just about anything these days, from shooting movies to following our every move - from connecting to smoke detectors to counting our steps and calories.
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Get ready for AARP tech explorer George Takei to be everywhere at once this summer, or at least it may seem that way. This week, for example, he visited The Daily Show's Jon Stewart to talk about a new documentary: To Be Takei: A Star's Trek for Life, Liberty and Love, opening in August after playing the film festival circuit. Not only that, Takei continues to use his social media clout to promote Allegiance, a Broadway-bound musical about the Japanese American experience in World War II. He starred in the show during its successful tryout in San Diego.
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One if by land and two if by sea? Maybe Paul Revere was a digital pioneer, since he "got" binary communication centuries before the digital cataclysm started to shake today's world.
George Takei of Takei's Take spoke to a crowd during the SXSW conference in Austin.
George Takei understands the evolution of his popularity. As Hikaru Sulu in the original Star Trek TV series, he made fans of his own generation and they "raised their kids right" to form the next generation of Trekkies. Now, having made himself something of a social media rock star, Takei reaches all demographics.
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