victims

Looking up free credit score
“Free credit scores” are effective bait. Just ask any of the 200,000 consumers who complained to the Federal Trade Commission about one recent online scheme that lured them with “free” access to their credit scores … then snagged them with a common switch: billing $30 a month for credit monitoring services they never ordered.
Millennials taking group selfie
Despite the popular perception — more likely, because of it — those at highest risk of falling for a scam are millennials, not their grandparents or parents.
Student loan graphic of graduation cap on hundred dollar bills
College students and others who have student loans are the latest target of IRS impersonators. In this iteration of the ongoing, widespread scam, fraudsters threaten arrest and other penalties unless a nonexistent “federal student tax” is paid immediately.
For Rent sign in front of home
Counting the days until summer vacation, downsizing, or are the kids heading off to college? Count on attempted rental rip-offs, which have earned perennial placement on many Top Scam lists throughout this decade.
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En español | The statistics are grim and are predicted to only get worse as the boomer generation ages.
Woman using a discount coupon on a digital tablet on the sofa
Maybe you saw that recent Facebook post promising a free $200 Nordstrom gift card. Or perhaps it was that $100 coupon for Lowe’s, which just resurfaced after a similar “campaign” last spring, or the latest coupon on social media, touting a free Disneyland vacation for four.
Toddler girl with brown eyes and hair
No matter where you live, a credit freeze is a great way for you to prevent identity theft — particularly the opening of new credit cards, loans and service accounts in your name. But depending on where you live, a freeze isn’t easy to get for your offspring.
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It’s bad enough being scammed out of your money once. But some older consumers are being conned a second time by so-called asset recovery companies promising to help recover the money lost in the initial fraud, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) warns.
Happy surprised Elderly woman working on laptop
With Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes envelopes in the mail and television commercials on the air, Sweepstakes Scam Season is now in full throttle. Although there are other Prize Lies, the biggest jackpot for scammers continues to be in pretending to be from PCH — and they’re currently offering nefarious notifications of winning the advertised “$5,000-a-week-forever” prize.
What is the cost of Internet security?
Catherine Heslep was logging off Gmail when her computer was hijacked, another victim of ransomware. “Your files have been encrypted,” the message on the screen proclaimed. “You will not be able to access them without an encryption code.”
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