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You’d think after a lifetime of growing and harvesting peaches, you’d get sick of eating them. But the Masumoto family still loves peaches and serves them up every way imaginable. “I love peaches, almost literally [they’re] in my blood,” says David “Mas” Masumoto, 62, the farmer who has nurtured his parents’ peach groves.
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Do you know an AAPI hero who works or volunteers at a nonprofit that serves 50-plus Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) — someone who’s always there and can be relied on by the organization? If you do, nominate her or him for AARP’s AAPI Heroes Award.
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As we have come to the close of another empowering Black History Month, once again we are hit squarely with a reminder that there are still some places and institutions where African Americans/blacks have yet to receive full recognition.
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Among the more shocking statistics about domestic violence is that African American women die at the hands of a spouse or family member much more often than men or women of other races. Domestic violence happens year round, so let’s remain aware of the signs.
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One of the main reasons that the mortality rate for African Americans remains disparately high for heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes is because we too often delay going to the doctor for symptoms or regular checkups. By the time we go, the health condition is sometimes worse.
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