With less than a month until Election Day, political campaigns are in high gear, and party control of Congress, Governor’s mansions and state houses are on the line. The landscape is volatile to say the least. But, one thing is certain . . . candidates who ignore older voters do so at their peril.
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On November 4th, like millions of Americans, I’ll head to the polls to cast my ballot. I’ve done my homework, know where the candidates stand on important issues — like financial security and support for family caregivers — and I’m ready to vote.
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A federal judge in Milwaukee has struck down Wisconsin's voter ID law, holding that it unconstitutionally discriminates against low-income and minority voters, who are less likely to have photo IDs or the documents needed to obtain them.
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The right to vote. Seems like it was settled a long time ago, when we gave women the vote, did away with poll taxes and lowered the voting age to 18.
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You've probably read about the problems that many voters - especially older voters - have encountered under voter ID laws, many of which are relatively new. (There was the recent case, for example, of former House Speaker Jim Wright being turned away because, at 90, he didn't have a valid driver's license.) Among those who may have to make long trips to government offices to obtain voter ID cards are people without driver's licenses (which, like Wright, many older Americans may no longer have), student or employee ID cards (which older Americans likely may not have had for years), or - in the curious case of Virginia - a handgun permit (I guess maybe some older Americans have those).
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Many of the lawsuits challenging voter ID laws in the states argue that they have an unequal impact on people of color and poor people.
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Just a month before the presidential election last year, a lawsuit brought by 94-year-old Vivienne Applewhite temporarily blocked the key component of a Pennsylvania law requiring strict photographic identification to vote. Now the challenge to the constitutionality of the law is back in state court for a more permanent ruling.
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