walking

A woman stretching her arm over her head along a waterfront
Want to help protect your brain? Small lifestyle changes can have a big impact. Here are four steps that women can take to help keep their minds strong.
Two women wearing face masks walking and social distancing outside
Here’s another unhealthy trend we can blame on the pandemic: Many of us are walking less. And not just Americans, according to reports.
Three women looking out at something
Five years ago, three friends who loved the outdoors quit their jobs, traded their homes for RVs and began hiking their way across the country.
An ethnic senior woman smiles while kayaking with her husband
Information and advice on living more healthy lives, it seems, is everywhere. It’s on every platform, digital and traditional—online and print, videos and books, webinars and live seminars, network news and online features.
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Living an active lifestyle is a fun way to maintain a healthy mind and body.
SaveTheDate
As a member of the Every Body Walk! Collaborative, an America Walks initiative, AARP Livable Communities will be walking to and talking at the second annual  National Walking Summit, in Washington, D.C., Oct. 28-30.
Two senior black women pwer walking
There's no debate that exercise can help us live a longer, healthier life. But let's say you have a chronic health condition that makes exercise difficult. Or maybe you're just very busy. Is there a minimum amount of exercise older adults can do to reap at least some benefits?
Senior man sleeping on sofa
How bad are Americans about not getting any physical activity whatsoever? Really bad. Like record-setting bad.
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Walking is the best, easiest way to avoid or reduce the pain of arthritic knees, but up to now no one seemed to agree on just how much walking was needed to get the most benefit. Now a new study suggests it's less than we thought.
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Recently, I wrote about New Year's resolutions and that, among those 50 years and older with resolutions, 25% are working on health/fitness goals--the largest category by far. We've found this focus on health and fitness in a variety of other research too. For example, AARP research shows that when…
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