women's health

Businesswoman in Menopause
Up to 80 percent of menopausal women suffer hot flashes, but doctors have typically reassured women that these embarrassing, uncomfortable bursts of heat and sweat won’t last long. You know, maybe six months. Two years, tops.
Woman receiving radiation therapy
Women 50 or older who have lumpectomies for small breast tumors are being given follow-up radiation treatment that lasts nearly twice as long as guidelines recommend, new research finds.
Beer pouring into glass
Having a couple of beers a week may reduce a woman's risk of getting painful rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by nearly a third, a new study finds.
Caregiving friends join to motivate exercise and up their hotness quotient.
As National Women's Health Week comes to a close, my thoughts turn to physical activity ... or lack thereof, which has been my problem. As a working caregiver (for both of my parents), I am typical: I focus on those two necessities of my life first and taking care of myself falls to the bottom of the list. It's a terrible conundrum - I can't let my work or caregiving slip, but there are only so many hours in the day. Plus, I've gotten out of the habit; it's hard to start up again once you stop.
Annual mammograms not required for women over 50
More than three years after a federally appointed panel of experts said most women don't need annual mammograms, a new study of mammogram rates shows that older women have pretty much ignored the advice.
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She is 62, and the smarty-pants scientists were sure her fertile days were long over. But then she (literally) gave them the bird by hatching a new little albatross chick.
doctorandpatient
It seems as if the annual health to-do list for women over 50 is getting shorter and shorter.
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If you're a woman shopping for long-term care insurance, prepare for some unwelcome news.
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That annual Pap test to detect cervical cancer? Women no longer need to have one every year, according to the country's largest obstetrician-gynecologist organization, joining a growing consensus that most healthy women can wait three to five years between tests if they have no other problems or risk factors.
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The following is a guest post from The Heart Truth®, a national awareness campaign for women about heart disease by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.
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