This Week in Boomer History: Thurgood Marshall … ‘Mary Poppins’

Notable events from our shared experience

Jimmy Carter Library and Museum 'hotline' propDespite the popular image, the “hotline” between Moscow and Washington wasn’t red, and it wasn’t a telephone. It was teletype machines first tested for sending direct messages on Aug. 30, 1963 – partly in response to the Cuban Missile Crisis a year earlier. The first message: “The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog’s back 1234567890.”

About 250,000 people flood the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 28, 1963, as part of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Martin Luther King Jr. tells the crowd: “I have a dream.”

Singer-songwriter Elton John makes his first U.S. club appearance at The Troubadour in Los Angeles on Aug. 25, 1970. Among those in the audience: Neil Diamond, Quincy Jones, Leon Russell and future Eagle Don Henley.

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Starring Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke, Walt Disney’s musical film Mary Poppins opens on Aug. 27, 1964. The movie is based on novels by P.L. Travers, who is introduced to a new generation nearly 50 years later by the film Saving Mr. Banks. (Watch a video below, from Disney, about music that was left out of Mary Poppins, and has now been brought back to life.)

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[R]adicals, hippies, yippies [and] moderates” protesting the Vietnam War and the political system besiege the 1968 Democratic convention in Chicago. As police beat and tear-gas demonstrators outside the convention hall, Hubert Humphrey is nominated for president on Aug. 28, 1968.

Althea Gibson becomes the first black competitor in international tennis on Aug. 28, 1950, when she beats Barbara Knapp of Great Britain in a first-round match at the U.S. National Championships (now the U.S. Open). Gibson would go on to win the U.S. Open and Wimbledon. She was also a professional golfer.

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Thurgood Marshall is confirmed as the first African American justice of the U.S. Supreme Court on Aug. 30, 1967. Marshall was the lawyer who won the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education case, when the Supreme Court ruled that schools couldn’t be “separate but equal.”

Thurgood Marshall, U.S. Supreme Court

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4 comments
2Papa
2Papa 5pts

This is a pretty milestone filled week in history. 

ss1009
ss1009 5pts

TO "Fred Griesbach"
"Who is the Infamous They"?
I could not find a link to a list of members of congress that are against Social Security, Medicare, or Medicaid.  I also did not find a link to those members of congress that support Social Security, Medicare, or Medicaid.  I could also did not find a link to those members of Congress that are "Fence Setter".  It is my opinion that donations would be more forthcoming if actual names were listed and made available with either a voting record, or some kind of rating listing those that are being targeted by AARP as being opposed to Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.  Personally I would be more inclined to Donate if that information were available.  A rating system would be helpful say from " non-suport 0-10 supporting".  If AARP is truly an advocate for retired persons then I would think that part of AARP's "MISSION STATEMENT" is to guard retirees in a non-partisan way by shedding some light and bringing some needed exposure into the otherwise deep recesses of  Congress.The following is a quote from the E-mail I received but it tells me nothing about the Who, Where, When, Why and How these people withhold support and which need a shove in the direction of support.  Personally I want NAMES, before I donate.  I WANT TO KNOW WHO IS AGAINST  RETIRED PEOPLE HAVING THE DIGNITY OF LIFE AND THE DIGNITY OF PURPOSE.
Who are these special interest?  I want NAMES AND ORGANIZATION.  Please don't just send me a vague nondescript E-mail about the threat.  I know there is a threat but I do not know from where it comes and I am better prepared to respond if I know who the enemy is.  Sun Tzu said "know your enemy".

"The silence on Capitol Hill doesn't mean our benefits are safe – we need a real commitment to protecting Social Security and Medicare as we enter the free-for-all leading up to the November 4th elections. Imagine what slashing your neighbor's $1,232 monthly Social Security payment would do to him, or what higher premiums and copays could mean to a family friend who already lives in a fixed budget."
Instead of working to protect the benefits you've earned,(who is this infamous they) they have yet to commit to saying no to deals that would cut them. And even more worrisome: special interests are pouring millions into this year's election to get Congress to follow their agenda – even if it means slashing Social Security and Medicare benefits.
Just an observation, just my opinion, and I will not being a donator until AARP puts some lists out there to review and evaluate.  When that happens I will probably make a donation.

Sincerely yours

Skip Speer