Kim Keister

Kim Keister leads the News & Politics team of AARP Media and is the editor / manager of the AARP Blog. He's been a journalist for decades, including eight years at AARP Bulletin and AARP.org. Follow him on Twitter @kimkeister
iStock_000017696525Large
Cerca de 6.4 millones de personas que compran seguros de salud a través del programa de intercambio federal de los estados podrán continuar recibiendo estos subsidios, luego de que la Corte Suprema de Estados Unidos diera su fallo el 25 de junio a favor de que la ACA (Ley del Cuidado de la Salud a Bajo Precio) permita apoyos financieros como esos.
US Supreme Court
Some 6.4 million Americans in states relying on the healthcare.gov federal insurance exchange will continue to receive subsidies for coverage after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled June 25 that the Affordable Care Act allows such financial support.
2014-04-23-Tim-Llewellyn-Surgical-Headshot
Many Americans, it seems, have a hard time talking about death. Even doctors struggle to deal with the mortality of patients who they know aren’t going to make it.
Supreme_Court_of_the_United_States
Deals between brand-name drugmakers and their generic drug competitors that keep cheaper products off the market might illegally prevent competition, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled June 17.
lipitor
If you owned the bestselling prescription drug of all time and its patent was about to expire, how would you prepare for competition from generic drugs?
Fire_and_water_back_tattoo
On the April 24 "Today" show, President Obama laid out the strategy he and Michelle have devised to discourage their daughters from getting tattoos.
Plant Explosion Texas
Sometimes it seems there's a special place in hell reserved for older people. When disaster strikes, it finds the most vulnerable among us.
BUDGET
Now that President Obama has sent his 2014 budget proposal to Congress, three blueprints for the nation's fiscal future are on the table.
400px-Elena_Kagan_Official_SCOTUS_Portrait_(2013)
The surprise entrance of an older couple caused quite a stir at the U.S. Supreme Court's first day of arguments about same-sex marriage. Justice Elena Kagan summoned the pair from her imagination, and it seems safe to say that Charles J. Cooper, the lawyer representing proponents of limiting marriage, never saw them coming.
BUDGET
From Kaiser Health News
Search AARP Blogs