Vice President, Multicultural Markets

Edna Kane-Williams has over 20 years of experience in senior management positions in nonprofit and for profit organizations. Her career has had a particular focus on the needs of older adults and multicultural communities. She serves as vice president, Multicultural Markets and Engagement, at AARP, focusing primarily on outreach to the African American/Black community.

Civil Rights Leaders: Church Still Stabilizes Black Community, Yet Shows Signs of Fatigue

Updated 11/24/14 From the tragic 1955 death of Emmett Till to the civil rights battles of the 1960s and even to the issues of unequal justice in 2014, civil rights leaders say the black church has remained a headquarters for healing, rejuvenation and planning. “It remains our oasis in the desert. It remains our spiritual reservoir. It remains the most independent organization controlled by black people,” says the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson Sr. “It even owns the most land. It …

Social Media Could Make New Strides for Civil Rights

Updated 11/18/14 The third in a series celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. If the organizers of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had used Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and other social media to draw people to Washington, what would have been different about that great gathering on the National Mall? That question kicked off a Martin Luther King Jr. holiday forum discussion this year. The conversation has grown from what could have happened …

For Many Veterans, the Battles Don’t End With the War

It seems so easy. We pass a veteran in uniform in an airport or on the street and we nod and say, “Thank you for your service.” It is a gracious greeting that is much appreciated by these men and women who have fought or stood bravely for the ideals of freedom for which America stands. But the fact is that, though veterans respond in kind to appreciation, many have brought the battlefield home with them in various ways. >> …

What Civil Rights Trailblazers Taught About Leadership

The second in a series celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. When introduced to Nelson Mandela in 1994, former AARP CEO A. Barry Rand first noticed the “quiet dignity” that the revered former South Africa president exuded. In a statement upon Mandela’s death, Rand also described the beloved Madiba’s “strong conviction, inspiring confidence, the wisdom of his years and experiences, and a strong moral character.” Rand concluded, “He was a man of purpose at peace with who …

Why Civil Rights Vets Keep Pressing On

The first in a series celebrating the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. The civil rights struggles of the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s were largely led by youth and college students, many who were members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee or the NAACP Student Council. Now in their 70s, 80s and even 90s, some view their civil rights mission as a life’s work with no retirement in the plan. “I still have an interest in my people, …

Breast Cancer Awareness Month: A Story of Love, Faith and Victory

Three years ago at age 55, Ricki Fairley was having a routine physical when her doctor found “a little tiny tumor under my nipple.” After further tests, she got the news: She had breast cancer. “I was shocked because I thought my breasts were, like, too small for breast cancer,” she muses three years after a mastectomy on Oct. 20, during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. A busy marketing executive, her initial thought was, “Gosh this is going to get …