Vice President, Multicultural Markets

Edna Kane-Williams has over 20 years of experience in senior management positions in nonprofit and for profit organizations. Her career has had a particular focus on the needs of older adults and multicultural communities. She serves as vice president, Multicultural Markets and Engagement, at AARP, focusing primarily on outreach to the African American/Black community.

Healing Principles of the Black Church Really Work

As the eyes of America watched the removal of the Confederate flag from the grounds of the South Carolina Capitol July 10, I feel thankful for the Black church and the principled role that it played in bringing a community together at a time that could have led to even greater strife and turmoil. Signing the bill to take down the flag, Gov. Nikki Haley eloquently said their actions “forever showed the state of South Carolina what love and forgiveness looks …

Be Creative! Keep Your Family Strong Year Round

With all the family vacations, reunions, weddings, kids home from school and just plain family fun, next to the holidays, the summer is probably the best time of year for family gatherings. The role of families in our lives are immeasurable for the support, security and happiness they bring. Yet, we often hear negative statistics on the need to strengthen the black family. In our families, we’ve learned how to make situations work. Here’s some basic wisdom from black parents, …

Why Not a Summer Salute to Black History?

This salute is extremely late. I don’t mean late for Memorial Day or even Black History Month. I mean this salute — to black soldiers who fought in the Civil War — is more than 150 years late. But so was America’s salute. That’s because, according to historians, the U.S. Colored Troops, who fought bravely and sacrificially in the Civil War for our freedom from slavery, were not allowed to participate in the Grand Review Parade of 1865. That was …

Five Good Reasons to Celebrate the Fourth of July

Can you imagine the looks on their faces in the audience when abolitionist Frederick Douglass, speaking at a commemoration of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, asked the question, “What, to the American slave, is your Fourth of July?” Visit AARP Black Community >> Many historians proclaim that speech of July 5, 1852, called “The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro,” to have been among Douglass’ greatest orations. Pointing out the hypocrisy of owning slaves while celebrating independence, …

On Father’s Day, Let’s Show Black Men They Matter

The more I witness the vast gap between how some folks live in this country, the more I am grateful that I grew up in North Philadelphia with a strong father, mother and family. I am grateful for the close-knit group of neighbors, and the values and strength of folks — like my parents — who stared down hard times. And yes, on Father’s Day, I am especially thankful for my dad, the late Eugene Albert Kane Sr., a construction worker …

‘Selma’ on DVD — Take Movie Night to a New Level

A few months ago, I encouraged everyone to enjoy black history year round. Well, here’s a great opportunity now that the movie Selma is available on DVD. Visit AARP Black Community » This is a chance to continue supporting a powerful black film, but there are dozens of activities we can organize to make it a rich educational and cultural experience. Some suggestions: Hold a movie night to discuss and teach the millennials in our families the principles of nonviolence. Watch …