Olivia Dean

Olivia Dean is a policy analyst with the AARP Public Policy Institute. Her work focuses on a wide variety of health-related issues, with an emphasis on public health, health disparities, and healthy behavior.
The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program helps older adults with prediabetes make the required lifestyle changes to prevent diabetes, but there are currently few providers available to meet the growing need for the program.
Message 3 - Educate ENG
You’ve probably heard of diabetes—but what about prediabetes? Prediabetes is a condition where blood sugar levels are high, but not high enough to qualify as diabetes. While almost half of older adults have prediabetes, nearly nine out of ten don’t know they have it. That’s why having this conversation is so important.
Senior Man Eating Toast and Jelly Jam
Oral health conditions—like untreated cavities, gum disease, and tooth loss—are not inevitable consequences of aging. Access to adequate dental care among older adults can prevent or delay these problems and may lead to overall improvements in health and well-being among seniors.
Recent federal proposals would add additional barriers to an already underused program, including efforts to require older adults to prove they’re engaging in work activities for a certain number of hours per week or risk losing SNAP after three months.
Imagine living alone, being frail or living with a disability, and unable to leave your house without help. Now imagine feeling a hunger pang, opening up your fridge to find it empty, or wondering how you are going to get your next meal.
prediabetes
Taking steps to live a healthier life is very important to millions of consumers, but many don’t know where to turn or how to engage.
You’ve probably heard of diabetes—but what about prediabetes? Prediabetes is a condition where blood sugar levels are high, but not high enough to qualify as diabetes. While almost half of older adults have prediabetes, nearly nine out of ten don’t know they have it. That’s why having this conversation is so important.
On August 1, the Trump Administration released a final rule that will allow insurance companies to offer cheaper “short-term limited duration” health plans for longer periods of time.
As the U.S. population ages and SNAP faces the prospect of changes that could affect the future of the program, it becomes all the more important to examine the dynamics around this large segment of SNAP users. AARP Public Policy Institute’s recently released fact sheet takes a closer look at SNAP households with older adults.
Nearly half (48 percent) of U.S. adults ages 65 and older have pre-diabetes, meaning their blood sugar levels are high enough to put them at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is associated with a host of health complications, including stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and even amputations of the legs and feet.
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