A Hunger Hero Needs Your Vote!

hunger-hero-award

Who has done the most to fight senior hunger in America? To answer that question, we need you - yes, YOU! Through the AARP Foundation Hunger Hero contest, we've done some of the hard work for you, narrowing down the field of Hunger Heroes to our top five candidates. Now you have until Sept. 24 (at midnight, Eastern Time) to vote for your favorite Hunger Hero.

Your choices:

  • A San Diego woman who founded a non-profit organization to deliver one week's worth of nutritious meals to the elderly on the third weekend of every month, when hungry seniors often run out of their monthly benefits.
  • A man who left his home in New Hampshire and moved to New Orleans to help with Hurricane Katrina recovery. He founded a community center that is now one of the leading relief resource providers in the New Orleans area.
  • A woman who started a supermarket-style "choice" food pantry in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn; her organization now helps thousands of families.
  • A Madison, Wisconsin, man who founded a market-style food pantry that also serves free hot meals, including special Friday night dinners with table cloths, real silverware and occasional live music.
  • A woman who feeds needy Somali refugees who have settled in Idaho but does so while respecting their cultural food choices.

In the United States, no one of any age should go hungry. Yet today, 6 million older Americans face the threat of hunger and are forced to skip meals, buy poor quality food, or choose between paying for prescription medications or their next meal.

The finalists in the AARP Foundation Hunger Hero contest are testament to how the combination of vision, determination and a desire to help can improve the lives of hungry seniors. So check out the candidates and vote today!

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