AARP Knows Service

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Photo courtesy of AARP

This weekend will mark the 9th anniversary of September 11th. Although it wasn't an official Day of Service and Remembrance until 2009 (previously recognized as Patriot Day), to the employees of AARP, the tragedy sparked an internal desire and need to do something, anything, to give back. Though we couldn't physically help search New York and Pennsylvania, our "team" of 2,000 countrywide could do something in our own backyard, and thus started the AARP annual Day of Service.

Next Tuesday will mark our 10th Day of Service or DOS as we AARPers call it. It's always a day full of energy, fun, and a lot of sweaty employees. While some employees will spend the day knitting hats for the needy, or making care-packages for the troops, others will clean up parks, and (like me) will prepare meals at soup kitchens. I'll spend the day preparing dinner for the residents of Miriam's Kitchen and I can't wait.

Giving back and being a part of the community is at the core of AARP. As our founder, Ethel Percy Andrus said, "The human contribution is the essential ingredient. It is only in the giving of oneself to others that we truly live."

Does your employer have an annual Day of Service? If you want to give back to your community on September 11th, go to www.createthegood.org to search for volunteer opportunities in your area.

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