Run for a Reason this Season

Last month my best friend ran the Baltimore 5k. It was her first race ever and when finished she said she felt so accomplished. The sense of personal achievement she said was overwhelming. If she could do it, so could I, I thought. But, what if in addition to that pride of busting through the finish line, I sign up to run or walk for a cause?


I don't consider myself a runner really. But that's what's so great about running for a cause, you don't have to be a long-distance runner to run. You don't even have to be in the best shape. It's not about beating out the other runners now it's about running for something bigger than you. "Struggling through a training run or a race is nothing when compared to the challenges faced by those fighting illness, disease, or other hardships. Running for a cause can help put things in perspective."


So my first objective is to search for one, and boy, are there a lot of runs, especially around this time of year. Check out the list of Turkey Trots happening Thursday in the DC/MD/VA area alone. You can search for Turkey Trots in your area by typing in your state and "Turkey Trot" in Google as I did.


But I don't think I'll be able to run a 5K quite yet, although running before I chow down on turkey day does sound like a superb idea. Fortunately, there are several charity runs and walks planned for 2011, like the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer next May or the Walk for MS also in the spring. I think it's also important to pick a cause that means something to you.


Have you ever ran or walked for a cause? Share your story with us!

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Photo courtesy of End Cancer

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