WANTED: Skills to Do Good

Are you looking for a way to make a difference? Do you have a skill that would benefit a local organization or group?

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Take for example, Alexis' story. "Alexis is a database professional who created a Salesforce Database for Room to Grow, saving the organization $24,000!  As a result of her hard work, Room to Grow is a more efficient organization with greater capacity to serve more beneficiaries. Alexis's database has helped impoverished NYC families receive the tools they need to ensure their babies have what they need to develop in their first three years of life."

So how was Alexis able to do this awesome deed? It's all thanks to Catchafire.

"Since launching two years ago, Catchafire has provided professionals the opportunity to give their skills and expertise to social good organizations they are passionate about. For each of our projects, a professional can put a value to their skill and instantly know they know they've saved an organization thousands of dollars."

"Our hope is to connect potential pro bono professionals and inspire them to get involved further," said Jessica Kantor from Catchafire. "The impact is greater than we can imagine," said Kantor.

Do you have a unique skill that could help a non-profit strive? Maybe you're good with computers? Public relations? Graphic Design? Numbers? Not sure what you could do? Be inspired by the Catchafire  blog, where they're featuring 60 social good organizations over 60 days.

Head over to  Catchafire and start making a difference today!

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