AARP's Twitter Team Gets The Word Out About Hunger

Today, from 11am-2pm ET, AARP's Create The Good team lead a "twitter-thon" of epic proportions, inviting friends, followers and notable speakers to get the word out about the six million older Americans who are at risk of hunger.

AllUCanTweat.jpg

AARP's Twitter team donated their lunch hour and were joined by friends to spread the word.

By using the Twitter hashtag #AllUCanTweat to unite people across the country around spreading the word, we reached over 896,000 people in just three hours and it's still going strong.
Robert Eggers of DC Central Kitchen was dropping "tweet sized bombs" for the assembled crew to share with their followers. Robert reminded us that "the older Americans in need are the people who fought world wars for us, who taught our children, who built our highways... we owe them more." He also highlighted the impact of the baby boomer generation which will put further pressure on the situation.
Sous Chef and Miriam's Kitchen board member Joe Kochan shared how their organization relies on local farmers to donate fresh ingredients. They serve 80,000 meals a year... and the average cost is just over $1.
Small amounts can indeed make a difference. AARP's Kevin Donnellan stressed that we can make an impact on those in need. He announced the organization's increasing commitment to hunger issues for older Americans and urged people to text "hunger" to 50555 to donate to AARP Foundation's efforts.
There are so many ways to help:

So, keep getting the word out. You can find statistics and ways to help at CreateTheGood.org.
Special thanks to our friends at Lifetuner, PBS, Global Giving, Hands On Network, Beth Kanter, Craig Newmark, Sarah Stanley, North Texas Food Bank, Chicago Cares, Chef Jose Andres and hundreds more of you for your generous time and tweets!

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