Drive to End Hunger Makes First Donation to Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida

 

As race fans everywhere prepare for this weekend's Daytona 500, Drive to End Hunger kicked off the race season Thursday morning with a major donation to Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida.  Working with Feeding America and Winn-Dixie, DTEH presented the food bank with $10,000 to help feed hungry seniors in central Florida.  Additional donations are being collected at the "Winn-Dixie Winner's Circle," a food drive at central Florida Winn-Dixie stores that continues through Sunday.

Because Second Harvest Food Bank is able to leverage each dollar of cash donations to provide nine dollars' worth of food to hungry Central Floridians, the contribution will provide $90,000 in value to hungry Floridians. You can read more of the story HERE.

54141ea0-a1f2-4d33-b5c0-4a81b0eba580.Large

In addition, it was announced earlier today that the Daytona International Speedway will donate all extra food items from the 53rd Annual Daytona 500 to the Second Harvest Food Bank of Central Florida. "This donation is a great opportunity to help people who are struggling in the Daytona area and to build momentum for Drive to End Hunger as we take the 24 car around the country this season," said Jeff Gordon, four-time Sprint Cup Series Champion. You can read more about the announcement HERE.

If you want to know more about Drive to End Hunger follow them on Twitter at @Drive2EndHunger or like them on Facebook.


Search AARP Blogs

Related Posts
October 27, 2015 05:58 PM
Lexi Jadoff, 31, is a driven, ambitious Washington, D.C., consultant with a unique way of de-stressing. She volunteers with The Reading Connection (TRC), a nonprofit that promotes reading for at-risk families. Jadoff is among the Read-Aloud volunteers who read each week with children at shelters and affordable apartment complexes.
September 17, 2015 02:29 PM
Some people take a fitness class before heading to work. Others jog a mile or two. Jennifer Kenealy, 45, gets her morning workout by hauling boxes of children’s books to schools, recreation centers, youth-focused nonprofit organizations and other sites. These are spots where children of low-income families congregate as part of Alexandria Book Shelf (ABS), a citywide literacy program run by the uber-creative DreamDog Foundation.
September 08, 2015 11:10 AM
Men in tuxedos and women in sparkly jackets mingle in the Green Room of the Little Theater of Alexandria (LTA) in Virginia. A pianist in the far corner plays show tunes on a baby grand piano while a small group sings “Hello, Dolly.” Other guests sip wine and nibble on artistically presented hors d’oeuvres.