Help Someone Stay Warm - And Save Money!

It's winter, and in most of the U.S. that means it's cold. And that means people are cranking up the heat, which in turn means Americans are wasting more energy than they realize. According to some statistics, homes lose 50 percent of their heat through poorly insulated walls and ceilings, leaky doors, windows and fireplaces and other gaps.
Many people are unaware of how much energy they are wasting and others simply don't have the time or information to address their homes' energy efficiency on their own. That's where you can help. Using the Create the Good guide on home energy use, you can help others in your community shore up their energy waste and save money in the process. You can even help people determine if they are eligible for teh government's weatherization assistance program. It's always nice when doing good for others helps the environment - and therefore the world at large - at the same time.
Did you know that:
- ENERGY STAR-qualified compact fluorescent light bulbs use 75 percent less energy and last about 10 times longer than an incandescent bulbs.
- Lowering the temperature on a home water heater by 20 degrees can save nearly $50 a year on energy bills.
- Replacing or cleaning furnace air filters can save you 10 percent on heating and cooling bills.
- Ducts running through unfinished spaces (attics, crawl spaces and garages) that aren't properly sealed and insulated
can add 25 percent to a home's heating bill.
So: Check out the Create the Guide how-to guide, find a few people in your community to help and, while you're at it, make sure your own home is as energy efficient as possible. Your neighbors, and the environment, will thank you!
Have energy saving tips to share? Post them here!

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