More Older Americans Eating at Soup Kitchens for the Holidays

Not everyone will eat heartily this holiday season...
MSNBC covered a sad reality that's growing in soup kitchens and food pantries across the country - more and more older folks looking for food resources. Just to give you an idea: the number of older Americans living alone who seek help from food pantries in the U.S. increased 81 percent to 408,000 in 2008. Says the article:

"Older people also have the added disappointment of no cost-of-living increase in Social Security checks this year. 'Seniors were hit with the decline in the stock market,' said Mark Dunlea, executive director of the Hunger Action Network of New York State. 'It's unsettling when you lose a lot of your investment.' The New York City Coalition Against Hunger released a report on the city's soup kitchens and food pantries that found that 68 percent of responding agencies were seeing an increase in senior citizens. Hunger Solutions Minnesota said this month that food-shelf visits from older people increased 26 percent in the first half of this year, compared to the same period in 2008."


But with an increase in the need for help comes an increase in volunteers there to help. Check out AARP's Create the Good to find ways you can give back during the holidays.

Search AARP Blogs

Related Posts
October 27, 2015 05:58 PM
Lexi Jadoff, 31, is a driven, ambitious Washington, D.C., consultant with a unique way of de-stressing. She volunteers with The Reading Connection (TRC), a nonprofit that promotes reading for at-risk families. Jadoff is among the Read-Aloud volunteers who read each week with children at shelters and affordable apartment complexes.
September 17, 2015 02:29 PM
Some people take a fitness class before heading to work. Others jog a mile or two. Jennifer Kenealy, 45, gets her morning workout by hauling boxes of children’s books to schools, recreation centers, youth-focused nonprofit organizations and other sites. These are spots where children of low-income families congregate as part of Alexandria Book Shelf (ABS), a citywide literacy program run by the uber-creative DreamDog Foundation.
September 08, 2015 11:10 AM
Men in tuxedos and women in sparkly jackets mingle in the Green Room of the Little Theater of Alexandria (LTA) in Virginia. A pianist in the far corner plays show tunes on a baby grand piano while a small group sings “Hello, Dolly.” Other guests sip wine and nibble on artistically presented hors d’oeuvres.