Tell Us: How Do You Want to Volunteer?

There's a great op-ed today in the Chronicle of Philanthropy talking about how foundations can promote volunteering.

"The signs of interest in service are everywhere. A group of scholars and leaders housed at the Brookings Institution has proposed that Congress join with the White House to double the size of the Peace Corps and to establish a program of Global Service Fellowships to support American volunteers interested in working with nonprofit organizations, religious institutions, and universities that are committed to advancing peace and development. In the past few months, California created a new cabinet-level position for service and volunteering, and the U.S. Senate joined the House of Representatives in establishing the National Service Congressional Caucus."


At AARP, we're pretty focused on engaging people in opportunities to make a difference. In fact, nearly half of our 39 million members are out making a difference from their own communities to the halls of Congress. That's why AARP's joining ServiceNation, which is working to make more opportunities available to people who want to get more involved in national or community service.
So, tell us, what do you do to make a difference? And, while everyone's focused on engaging young people, how can AARP be doing more to make sure those of us over 50 have more opportunities too?

Search AARP Blogs

Related Posts
October 27, 2015 05:58 PM
Lexi Jadoff, 31, is a driven, ambitious Washington, D.C., consultant with a unique way of de-stressing. She volunteers with The Reading Connection (TRC), a nonprofit that promotes reading for at-risk families. Jadoff is among the Read-Aloud volunteers who read each week with children at shelters and affordable apartment complexes.
September 17, 2015 02:29 PM
Some people take a fitness class before heading to work. Others jog a mile or two. Jennifer Kenealy, 45, gets her morning workout by hauling boxes of children’s books to schools, recreation centers, youth-focused nonprofit organizations and other sites. These are spots where children of low-income families congregate as part of Alexandria Book Shelf (ABS), a citywide literacy program run by the uber-creative DreamDog Foundation.
September 08, 2015 11:10 AM
Men in tuxedos and women in sparkly jackets mingle in the Green Room of the Little Theater of Alexandria (LTA) in Virginia. A pianist in the far corner plays show tunes on a baby grand piano while a small group sings “Hello, Dolly.” Other guests sip wine and nibble on artistically presented hors d’oeuvres.