Tax Time? For You, Yes!

Tax-Aide_Cl Vol_Jones, Doyle and Berman, Marsha



Most people aren't thinking "taxes" in August, unless they filed for an extension on last April's filing deadline. But if you want to volunteer to help others during the 2012 filing season, now is the time to sign on to AARP Tax-Aide - the nation's largest free tax preparation and assistance service.

What is AARP Tax Aide?

It's an AARP Foundation program that helps low- to moderate-income taxpayers by making sure they receive applicable tax credits and deductions.  AARP Tax-Aide is free to taxpayers with low and moderate income, with special attention to those 60 and older. Through volunteers like you, AARP Tax-Aide has helped low- to moderate-income individuals for more than 40 years nationwide.

Even if you're not numerically inclined, Tax aide could use your help. If you like working with numbers, you can help clients fill out tax returns. If you're more of a "people person" you can volunteer to be a greeter and ensure clients have their paperwork in order. Or maybe you're best with technology, in which case you can help ensure taxpayer data security or provide technical assistance to volunteers.

AARP Tax Aide also needs communications specialists to help promote the program, and leaders to manage volunteers and track assignments.

To sign up, complete the AARP Tax-Aide Prospective Volunteer Form. An AARP Tax-Aide volunteer will get in touch with you to discuss next steps.

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