Candy Sagon

Candy Sagon is an award-winning food and health writer. She wrote about food and restaurants for The Washington Post, where she won a James Beard Foundation award for food feature writing, and was assistant health editor at AARP, where she wrote about nutrition and health research for the association’s publications and website. She currently writes about health and nutrition for a number of publications.

A woman smiling and dancing in front of a blank wall
It’s true that cognitive changes may happen as we get older. So how do you support a healthy brain into your 70s and beyond? Here are some suggestions.
A woman listening to something with headphones on
Music’s effects are remarkable, no matter what type of music you enjoy listening to or performing, according to research.
A man sitting on a chair at home and looking straight ahead
The Staying Sharp Power of Emotions Challenge explores responding to situations that trigger certain emotions and learning what to do when you need help.
A woman exercising on a stationary bike inside a home
Stationary bikes offer multiple benefits for brain and body, including for older adults with arthritis, back pain and mobility issues.
Rear view of a male hiker standing and looking at mountains
Staying Sharp’s Building Resilience Challenge offers practical techniques and tips on building resilience in the face of life stressors.
A man and his female caregiver standing behind him
A global pandemic significantly added more anxiety, depression, fatigue and loneliness to an already difficult task for caregivers, a study found.
A woman looking out the window of a building
As pandemic-related stress drags on, a new poll suggests that health care providers need to check on the mental health of their patients older than 50.
A woman looking at her smartphone while holding a coffee mug in her other hand
People love their digital devices. Take the Staying Sharp Digital Declutter Challenge to learn about what distracts you and how to deal with it.
An overhead view of grilled chicken meat and vegetable salad in a bowl
Experts say many older adults may need to get more protein than the recommended dietary allowance to help our brains and bodies as we age.
A Mediterranean antipasti on a garden table
Research has found that eating a Mediterranean diet over other certain foods may help protect your brain against dementia.
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