Candy Sagon

Candy Sagon is an award-winning food and health writer. She wrote about food and restaurants for The Washington Post, where she won a James Beard Foundation award for food feature writing, and was assistant health editor at AARP, where she wrote about nutrition and health research for the association’s publications and website. She currently writes about health and nutrition for a number of publications.

An overhead view of grilled chicken meat and vegetable salad in a bowl
Experts say many older adults may need to get more protein than the recommended dietary allowance to help our brains and bodies as we age.
A Mediterranean antipasti on a garden table
Research has found that eating a Mediterranean diet over other certain foods may help protect your brain against dementia.
A man sitting on a couch with a laptop on his lap
Sitting for hours each day does your brain and body no favors. Here are ways in which too much couch time can be harmful to your brain health as you get older.
A man and woman doing a leg stretch
Here's a do-it-yourself test for brain health: See how long you can stay balanced on one leg. It could indicate damage to small blood vessels in your brain.
A close up of a face mask being held in the hand of a woman outside
About half of Americans surveyed said they feel uneasy about adjusting to in-person interaction once the pandemic ends, even when vaccinated.
Two women sitting and talking with each other on a park bench
The pandemic hasn’t just stopped many of us from interacting with family and friends. It’s also stopped us from chatting with strangers.
A close up of Asian green curry with coconut milk in a pan
There’s growing interest worldwide in plant-based diets that skip — or at least scale back — meat and other animal products. But is it for the best?
An assortment of various foods, including fruits and vegetables
What makes the Mediterranean diet so popular with doctors and dietitians as an eating plan? For one thing, it has science behind it.
A close up of a hand holding a cigarette and shot glass
Some of the worst things you can do for your brain are bad habits, some of which can really take a toll on its mental abilities.
A close-up view of baked salmon with a pesto crust on a plate
Studies show that exposure to the tiniest air pollutant particles is linked to decreased brain volume and the risk of a decline in memory skills.
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