Tamara Lytle

Tammy Lytle has covered the White House, Congress, politics and breaking news in the nation's capital for 23 years. She is the former Washington bureau chief of the Orlando Sentinel and her work has appeared in newspapers magazines and websites.
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Spouses in same-sex marriages can now apply for Medicare benefits.
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While a new Gallup Poll finds that voters 65 and older have moved from "a reliably Democratic to a reliably Republican group" over the past two decades, voters in the next-oldest age bracket - 50 to 64 - haven't followed suit and still show an outright preference for the Democratic Party.
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Time is almost up. March 31 is the last day this year for most people to sign up for health coverage made available by the Affordable Care Act. If you have started the process and encountered problems, you have until April 15 to request an extension.
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Robert S. Strauss, who died March 19 at age 95, was a Washington insider back when that was a compliment.
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States have divided almost evenly on whether to expand Medicaid to millions more low-income Americans, many of them uninsured.
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Rep. Ralph Hall (R-Texas), the oldest member of Congress, faces a primary runoff after failing to lock up his party's nomination March 4.
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As expected, President Obama's budget proposal abandoned a call to change the way annual increases in Social Security benefits are calculated and continued a call for Medicare savings.
"Zack and Miri Make a Porno" Los Angeles Premiere
Alzheimer's disease accounts for more U.S. health care spending than any other disease, and that share will skyrocket as the nation's population ages, experts told members of a Senate health subcommittee on Feb. 26.
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Rep. John Dingell Jr. of Michigan has announced he will retire from Congress, leaving behind his record as the longest-serving Capitol Hill lawmaker in history.
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If Joe Newman of Sarasota, Fla., makes it to Capitol Hill, he could be a one-man Congressional Centenarian Caucus.
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