Thinking Policy

Older adults who get a Medicare Annual Wellness Visit are more than four times as likely to be screened for depression as those who opt out of this free health benefit.
The unemployment rate declines to a 50-year low but hiring slows in September. Plus, a look at international efforts to promote longer careers.
Minnesota has put a number of foundational strategies in place to meet the needs of older adults while managing the growth in our programs.
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Recent changes to Medicare Advantage's supplemental benefits could have significant implications for consumers.
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Research finds that overall the likelihood of re-careering declines with age, suggesting that older workers may face additional hurdles transitioning into new occupations.
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New Hampshire court found that work and community engagement requirements do not support the basic objective of the Medicaid program.
Multi-generational Hispanic family smiling in front of house
Polling data shows that contrary to popular belief, support for Social Security is consistently high in all age groups in the United States.
Nurse helping older man with a walker
Patients—not nurses—are the story when it comes to state legislative battles to modernize advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) scope of practice laws.
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The labor market rebounded in June 2019, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) monthly Employment Situation.
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Many eligible Medicare enrollees do not take advantage of their annual wellness visit benefit, or even understand what it is.
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Utah's waiver policies would likely result in the loss of Medicaid coverage for significant numbers of low-income Utahans who rely on the program for health care.
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The number of jobs added to the economy fell sharply in May, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
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Emerging waivers that impose work requirements and other harmful obligations on Medicaid beneficiaries as conditions of participation are likely to lead to significant numbers of people losing coverage, even as states incur greater costs.