Financial Health for All Ages

When I tell people I work for AARP, one of the first things they do is talk to me about their retirement plans, and often in terms of when they retire. More and more, however, I’m hearing about the kinds of plans they have if they retire. In many respects, working longer is something to be celebrated. We’re just beginning to understand the benefits of a multigenerational workforce, not to mention the increased personal fulfillment and even health benefits people …

The Family Caregiver–Mother’s Day Connection

With this being the week of Mother’s Day, it’s a good time to highlight a less-talked-about role of many women. As an AARP Public Policy Institute report recently discussed, 6 out of 10 family caregivers are female. (By “family caregiver,” I mean those who aren’t paid to help an ill or infirm family member.) Particularly at this time of year when we honor mothers, it’s important to remember that many of these women care for parents or a spouse while …

Labor Force Participation Rate for People Age 55+ Down Slightly in April

Employment overview for those age 55+   The April Employment Situation Report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) showed an increase in the number of jobs, with 211,000 added. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate, at 4.4 percent, was the lowest since May 2007. The number of people age 55-plus who are employed remained unchanged from March while the unemployment rate for this age group decreased from 3.4 percent to 3.2 percent. The labor force participation rate of the 55-plus population …

‘We Should Talk’: Cross-Sector Conversations on Livable Communities Show Great Promise

By Rodney Harrell and Stephanie K. Firestone The thousands of community planners who will come together this May at the American Planning Association’s (APA) National Planning Conference are increasingly aware of a demographic trend: Nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population will be over age 65 by 2030. Translation: Planners need to get together with aging network professionals and talk! Why? Many aging network professionals are in the business of designing plans with individuals to help them to thrive in …

The American Health Care Act Would Make Unsustainable Cuts to Medicaid

Recent policy conversations related to the American Health Care Act (AHCA) have focused on  proposals that would eliminate the Affordable Care Act’s critical protection for people with preexisting conditions. This  controversial proposal has drawn a lot of attention for good reason. Eliminating this important protection, which keeps insurance companies in the individual (non-group) market from considering health status when making coverage decisions, could hurt millions — especially older adults who tend to develop more health conditions as they age. But …

Protecting People with Preexisting Conditions: Upton Amendment, as Reported, is Not Enough to Get the Job Done

The Upton Amendment to the health care bill, American Health Care Act (AHCA), is not sufficient to protect people with preexisting health conditions. According to one estimate, it would take $178 billion per year to adequately fund state high-risk pools, where people with preexisting health conditions would go to access health insurance coverage. However, the AHCA would only provide $15 billion annually for two years and then taper off to $10 billion annually for seven more years. And, this is …