Jean Accius

Jean Accius is a nationally recognized thought leader on aging, caregiving and long-term care policy. He is Vice-President of the Long Term Services & Supports and Livable Communities Group within the AARP Public Policy Institute.
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Emerging waivers that impose work requirements and other harmful obligations on Medicaid beneficiaries as conditions of participation are likely to lead to significant numbers of people losing coverage, even as states incur greater costs.
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On March 27, 2019, a federal judge for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia issued decisions that are vitally important for Medicaid beneficiaries. The two cases, Gresham v. Azar and Stewart v. Azar, halted efforts in Arkansas and Kentucky to condition receipt of Medicaid benefits on securing work or volunteer activities, as well as other cuts to coverage. The court’s rulings reinforced an earlier decision against Kentucky’s work requirement and extended a similar reasoning to the Arkansas requirement.
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As AARP’s recent report highlights, the majority of Americans prefer to remain in their homes as long as possible. Helping to enable that are home- and community-based services (HCBS)—the kind of long-term supports provided to older adults and individuals with disabilities residing in communities as they age.
Medicaid is a crucial program for millions of people. But not everyone understands who’s eligible and the benefits; moreover, the program continues to evolve. Here’s what you and all consumers should know.
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All Americans deserve a high-performing system of long-term services and supports (LTSS) for older individuals and those with disabilities, one that ensures access to affordable, high-quality services that are person- and family-centered.  Services and supports should be delivered from the perspective of the individuals receiving care, and, when appropriate and necessary, their families.
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Earlier this year, Arkansas became the first state to implement a  policy that—with some exemptions, including for people age 50 and older—requires adult Medicaid enrollees to work 80 hours every month at the state’s minimum wage. The policy has serious implementation problems, and is quickly ncreasing the number of uninsured in the state.
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November is National Family Caregiver month — when we recognize and honor the 40 million family caregivers across this country.
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For decades Medicaid has served as a critical safety net for millions of people with limited income and resources. Nearly 70 million people, including millions of children and adults with disabilities and low-income older adults, rely on the Medicaid program for health care coverage and assistance with basic life functions such as eating, dressing, and bathing.
As the month of June winded down, a federal court issued a ruling invalidating Kentucky’s effort to attach work and other community engagement requirements to receive Medicaid benefits.
The United States is quickly approaching a historic milestone. By 2035, the number of older adults age 65 and older will exceed the number of children for the first time in American history. Each day, 10,000 people turn 65, and that will continue for years to come. This will impact states and communities and reshape industries.
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